Found a DIY for the d16y8 Intake Manifold swap - Honda Civic Forum

Found a DIY for the d16y8 Intake Manifold swap

Reply

 
 
 
Old 11-04-2006
  #1  
Registered!!
Thread Starter
iTrader: (4)
 
Redviking's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Location: Montreal, Qc, Canada
Posts: 829
Rep Power: 0
Redviking is on a distinguished road
Found a DIY for the d16y8 Intake Manifold swap

I just found that using google! Maybe it's a repost but I am pretty sure it's not!

http://www.hondacivicforum.com/m_238.../tm.htm#238360

Why not steal it, and put it here??? If I cannot have the credits of creating it, at least I will have some for stealing it from another site!

The guy did more steps then what I understood from some members here... well, hope it will help!

7th Generation Civic Y8 Intake Manifold Swap
Including fuel pump upgrade & return fuel line

Required Parts:
D16Y8 intake manifold (OEM or aftermarket – strongly discourage Skunk2)
Intake manifold gasket – 6th gen
Aftermarket intake – I used 99-00 Si Weapon R Secret Weapon
Adjustable Fuel Pressure Regulator – If using 7th gen rail need universal
Fuel Rail – You can use 7th gen rail and modify it… strongly suggest replacing, makes swap much easier
Fuel Rail bolts from 96-00 Civic (4-6) Trust me.
240cc saturated fuel injectors – Only if replacing fuel rail
Injector gaskets from earlier gen. Civic
SSB fuel lines – Get about 23 feet, one 10ft (this will be for return) and one 13ft no larger than -6AN. Get all required hose ends and fittings. (more on this later)
Fuel Pump – Make sure it is a High Pressure pump; recommend Walbro or Holley.
3’ 5/16th fuel line (rubber)
2’ 3/8th fuel line (rubber)
~ 16AWG wire in 3 different colors (red, black, and another)
3 8mm nuts
2 ½” length steel spacers

Additional Parts:
Fuel filter – made it easier to install fuel pump
Throttle body – I believe you can use your OEM TB.

WARNING!!!!!!
If you decide to use a Skunk2 intake manifold you will NOT, I repeat NOT be able to go back to stock without replacing the bolts screwed into the engine which the manifold sits on, also removal of a portion of firewall is necessary.

Preparation
If you do not already own one a Haynes or Chilton manual, buy one.
To bleed the fuel pressure remove the glove box and refer to the manual to see which relay to pull; on mine I only had two 1 blue, 1 brown; remove the relay(for me it was blue).


Start the engine and allow it to run till it dies. Shut engine off. Disconnect negative battery terminal.

Tools:
Air compressor capable of operating a die-grinder
Die-grinder ($30 Husky from Walmart worked great)
Ratchet set (required metric sockets 8mm-14mm most commonly used)
Metric wrenches – 10-14mm
Tap and Die set (metric)

Step 1. Removal of OEM parts
I am not going to go into much detail, what I will say is that a Haynes or Chilton manual is a great tool.
• Remove air box or intake if you have an aftermarket one installed
• Remove accelerator cable from throttle body (also remove cruise cable if equipped)
• Unplug MAP sensor and mark sensor clip for identification later; pull sensor, set sensor aside
• Unplug TPS sensor and mark sensor clip for ident.
• Unplug EVAP sensor and mark clip for ident. Remove from TB and manifold.


• Remove coolant bypass hoses from IACV on TB. (Shop towels or a rag underneath will help reduce coolant spill)
• Remove throttle body
• Remove PCV fresh air connector.
• Remove valve cover and remove nut on back of wiring cover connected to manifold.


• Remove throttle and cruise cable and cable holders.
• Remove Fuel line from fuel rail, simple squeeze and pull. (Check Haynes or Chilton for verification)


• Remove EVAP line from pipe on fuel rail. (arrow in picture above shows EVAP line)
• Remove fuel rail bolts and fuel rail.
o Set fuel rail and injectors aside in a plastic bag.
• Remove all other hoses/sensors/etc (if any) from manifold.
• Jack car up for access to underneath bolts/nuts connecting manifold to head.
• Remove all bolts and nuts connecting manifold. (3 nuts, 2 bolts; bolts are at each end of manifold, nuts are 2 on top, 1 on bottom)
• Remove manifold.
• At this point I strongly urge those considering using Skunk2 manifold to think about how long they plan on keeping the vehicle and if you have a friendly mechanic and a welder. The next step will require you to trim your firewall and cut and re-thread the bolts from the engine head which the manifold sits on. If you are replacing the stock TB w/ the Skunk2 you will also need to make an “extender” in order for the TPS to fit. More about this later.

Step 2. Preparing Vehicle for Manifold
Ok I will do my best to recall and point out any and all issues I ran into later in the swap so you can be prepared and do them in this step.
• Let’s get into the cutting first, here is where your die-grinder and air compressor come in handy. I don’t have a picture but I will describe it in detail.
o You’ll need a cutting disc for your die-grinder and you’ll need to plug up the runners of the cylinder head w/ shop towel; I suggest not using thin paper towel as the die-grinder cutting produces heat.
o From the end of the threads closest to the engine, measure 1/8 inch and mark with a sharpie on all 3 bolts, cut at these lines.
o Once finished cutting all three bolts start with your 10mm die and begin to re-thread the bolt, the 10mm won’t do much but it will give you a guide to use on smaller dies. You should be able to turn the 10mm by hand. Start all three bolts or do one at a time which ever you are comfortable with. Next you will need a 1 inch socket and a ½ inch ratchet, I found it convenient to use a smaller socket to put inside the 1 inch to aid in keeping the threads straight, now place your 9mm die into the socket and begin to tighten and thread the bolts. Once you are done with the 9mm do the same with the 8mm die. You only need to thread a little more than half-way down the bolt. After all bolts are done replace the cutting disc on the die-grinder.
• Now we will trim the firewall. **NOTE: This is only necessary if using the Skunk2 manifold. If using OEM or short runner manifold skip this step and move on.


o Remove the bolts and wire clips circled in yellow, cut along black line and underneath as far back as possible. The A/C line (thick alum. Pipe) may need to be moved out of the way, remove bolt and carefully bend alum. Piping as needed.
o Once finished trimming the firewall take a grinding stone and your die-grinder and smooth out the edges.
 NOTE**** This part of the firewall will be patched later.
• Now that all that is done we will move on to trimming the manifold itself so the bolts will line up properly.


o I used a metal cutting rod that came with my die-grinder to widen the top bolt holes. I did nothing about the intake runners, I’m going to leave that for a port-match when I get a P&P done.


• That is the power steering fluid line, it needs to be moved a bit, the easiest way I found was to take circle 1 and bend it straight down then take the plastic to metal converter and bend it in the direction of the arrow. If you are a little sketchy about bending it DON’T, if you break it, it costs $120 from the dealership to replace. Circle 2 is the nut that keeps it connected, remove, allow to drain and then remove it from the power steering pump via two bolts (second image)


o After getting the manifold in replace the line, this will make it much easier to bend into necessary shape, but takes some time since you will not have much room to work.
• Now the larger A/C line will also need to be moved, I found it easiest to just bend it upward, and let it sit just above the manifold(once the manifold is installed).
o Before:


The circled bolts and hoses will need to be removed before bending the A/C pipe. NOTE*** If you are not replacing the fuel rail and using the stock fuel lines, you are on your own here; I suggest you use an OEM manifold.
o After:


• Next remove your batter from your car, also remove the battery stand. Set the battery aside; I relocated my batter to inside the car and ran wires. If doing so follow the next step, if not skip.
o Ok running the wires is very simple, what you will need is battery wire from PepBoys or any other auto shop, get 2 cables at the longest length; you will also need 8 gauge wire( I used wire from Lowes get about 6-8 ft. possibly more if running from trunk) You will also need electrical connectors, I found a nice one at Lowes, it was metal with screws and it came with shrink wrap(Need at least 4). You will also need to drill through the floor of your car/trunk where ever you decide to place it. Pick up some rubber grommets (3/8ths I think, about the size of your pinky). What I did to connect the wires to the OEM ones was I cut off the battery connector from the stock cable and shave the plastic back a little, connect your stock w/ your new wires w/ the connector and shrink wrap. Viola!
• If you are replacing your stock fuel line continue reading; if not skip and move on.
o Ok get out your die-grinder and cutting disc again, verify that the line is the fuel line and start chopping it up, where the line travels down the firewall I wasn’t able to do anything about, too much in the way, so I cut as far down from the top and as far up from the bottom that I could. Also the EVAP line, it’s easier if you cut and replace that line; I chose to cut mine at the bottom of the firewall. Remove all cut line from vehicle. Leave cut until manifold is installed. We will add the fuel line when I cover replacing the fuel pump.
Step 3. Upgrading Fuel System (Includes pump, lines)
We will start with the pump and then add the lines; the lines are fairly simple so I won’t be talking much about them, I’ll say what you will need you can choose the size of your line and all else. You will need plenty of towels incase things get messy and make sure you have the windows down or the doors open, breathing in gas fumes can make you sick.

• The pump is a bit difficult removing so be gentle and take care. The “lid” for the fuel tank is under your rear seat. Unscrew the 4 bolts holding the cover on and then unplug the wires going to the pump, move the cover to the side where it won’t get damaged.
• Remove the stock fuel line (same as removing from fuel rail) and push out of the way.
• Get a hammer and a flat-head screwdriver and start tapping the ridges of the screw on cover lid to the fuel tank in a counter-clockwise direction; once loosened try unscrewing the rest by hand. Pull that off and set aside.


• Carefully remove pump housing from tank, I can’t give specific directions for removing it; you’re going to have to tilt it at some point to get it out; BE VERY CAREFUL not to damage the fill gauge or you will never know how much gas you have till you replace it.
o Once removed place on some towels and let dry, cover the tank up so dirt does not get into the tank.
o Once dry take the pump housing apart unplug the electrical wires from the top of the housing; should have no problem taking it apart without removing the hoses, make a note of what hose leads to what nipple, disconnect the stock pump from the hose, remove and set aside.
o Remove the stock FPR and set aside with stock pump.
o Use the stock fuel pump holder on the new pump and install it in the housing.
o Remove any other old hoses and throw them away; this is where the 5/16” hose you bought comes into play, when you put the new hoses on switch them at the top of the pump housing. Use high pressure clamps to make sure the hoses stay.



o Drill a hole anywhere in the top of the housing and place a NPT-AN adapter, I used a 3/8”NPT to -6AN. Screw in tight, use a Teflon paste to help seal the hole.
o Plug in any and all electrical connections that were unplugged.
o Once everything is plugged in gently set the housing back in the tank and put the cap back on nice and tight, might be a little difficult.
o Plug electrical connection back in. Leave cover off until assured pump works properly.


• Stainless Steel Fuel Lines
o You will need plenty of zip ties and a pair of scissors for this.
o First get your length of 3/8th’s rubber hose place a -6 AN hose end on one end(90* or straight will work great) and then connect the other end to the fuel pump.


o Next take your 13’ piece of hose and measure the length you will need to connect it to the fuel rail, use the zip ties to secure the hose to get a more accurate measure. Cut as needed – Prep the line by wrapping electrical tape around the area where you will be cutting; cut closer to one end of the tape; don’t remove tape, to cut use the cutting disc and your die-grinder.
o Dependent on what size hose you bought and if you are using an aftermarket fuel filter you will need from 2-4 hose ends; 1 90* and 1-3 straight.
o To put the hose ends on the hose you will need a pair of gloves, a vice (wall mounted or the likes), an adjustable wrench and various metric wrenches; take the cap and twist it over the hose(leave the tape on from where you cut previously), once it is fully on start the connector end into the cap, then use the vise and wrenches to finish, be careful not to tighten too much as you can easily damage the connector end. This can be difficult and may take some time to accomplish.
o Use the 90* to fit on the fuel rail.
o If you are using a fuel filter, get the measurements for the openings and search Jeg’s or SummitRacing for AN adapters that will work, crush washer are also a must (or you will be cleaning up a lot of fuel later).
o You will need a -xAN to -yAN adapter to fit on the fuel rail.(where x = size of hose & y = opening of fuel rail)
o Secure your hoses underneath with zip ties.

Step 4. Installing Manifold/TB/FR/FPR/Injectors
Ok at this step you are nearly finished, the journey is coming to an end and you should see a small tiny light at the end of the tunnel. A lot of this part of the project takes finesse so don’t get frustrated, take a break, drink a beer and come back later.

• Manifold installation – First put the gasket on the bolts coming out of the cylinder head. I found the easiest way to get the manifold on was to insert the back of the manifold under the AC hose and ease the front end down as you lift the back end up, this may take some finesse and some force at times, possibly insert the left end of the manifold first and work the right end into position, once the bolts are lined up in the holes place the manifold flush again the head and start the top two nuts on the bolts; DO NOT tighten all the way yet. Make sure all hoses behind the manifold are not in the way as it will move slightly when the engine jerks or under WOT the engine does move a little, make sure there is an inch between the manifold and anything it can hit. As long as the manifold is far enough away not to hit anything , tighten the nuts and install the bolts with the steel spacers and tighten about 1/3 turn past hand tight. Once this is set and everything looks good we can move on to installation of the fuel rail, fuel pressure regulator, injectors and then on to the throttle body.
• Place your plug at one end of the fuel rail(I chose to plug the side opposite the “intake” fuel line) make sure you use a crush washer to ensure a proper seal. Now take you’re AN union adapter with crush washer and fasten to the other opening. Plug the opening in the top of the fuel rail unless you are using it for a FP gauge. If you are using a fuel pressure regulator that mounts right to the fuel rail, follow the instructions that came with the FPR. If using a universal FPR find a suitable place to mount it and follow the instructions provided. Fuel rail, I suggest that you buy extra bolts earlier I suggest 4-6, you may be good with 4 but expect to buy up to 6 they are very easy to strip the threads on the top of the bolt. Use a bit of anti-seize on the end of the bolts going into the intake manifold, hand tighten. Place your injector gaskets in the 4 injector openings; coat the gaskets with a thin coat of oil, coat the injector ends with oil and insert in the injector gaskets. Place the fuel rail on top of the bolts.
• Line up the injectors with the holes in the fuel rail, you may need to tap the fuel rail onto the injectors to ensure a sealed fit. Gently put on the stock nuts from the 7th gen. fuel rail (they will fit) and tighten hand tight. Don’t over-tighten because the threads strip very easy.
• Put your throttle body together, if you have aftermarket TB you’ll need a TPS from a 5th or 6th gen, the TB comes with screws for it. To get the TPS off you’ll need to cut a flat head groove in the screw with your die-grinder and cutting disc and unscrew it. Screw on the TPS and position it with the top lobe farthest to the left. You’ll need to drill out the hole for the MAP sensor and use 2 o-rings and a couple washers to make sure it seals. Put the rubber connector on the TB and tighten the clamp.
• You will need to have an “extender” made for the throttle body to fit if you are using an aftermarket one, I’m not sure about the OEM, it may fit without the “extender”. Here is a picture of the extender.


• To make this I took my gasket that came with the Skunk2 manifold to a machinist and told him that I needed two plates with that exact design layout of the gasket and the material had to be weldable. Then I bought a mandrel bent 45* 2.5” exhaust pipe and cut it at the beginning of the bend and 25 degrees from the first cut. Took them to a mechanic that did welding and had him weld it up, make sure you leave enough room to get the bolts in. I had to use 2 gaskets on each side when I put this together to get a good seal.
o Put the extender on the manifold first and then put the throttle body on the extender. Tighten bolts as much as you can. Connect your accelerator cable to the TB.


Make it look like this.
• Install your intake onto the throttle body, check for fitment and tighten clamp on intake. Now onto the electrical…

Step 5. Electrical Work
Ok most of this is VERY simple, all you are doing is extending the wires so they will reach the sensors in their new positions. For the TPS you will need to use the connector from the 5th or 6th generation civic and connect the power wire to the green/yellow wire, black to black and the other wires together. For the IACV from a 5th or 6th again, it is only a 2 wire connector, again power wire to green/yellow, red to black/red and ground to the TPS ground. I have only hooked up the electrical connector and the coolant hoses, I did not connect it to the manifold so you will need to close the holes in the back of the manifold and the screw hole.

At this point connect your fuel lines and turn your car to the on position, DO NOT START YET, check the fuel lines for leaks and check the rail/injectors for leaks, if none exist start the engine and let it idle for 15-20 minutes to allow the ECU to go into closed loop mode. While the engine is idling check for any vacuum leaks, fix where applicable. At this point in time you may throw engine codes, the two most common I got were P1106 Barometric Pressure (BARO) Sensor Circuit Range/Performance Problem and P1129 Manifold Absolute Pressure (MAP) Sensor Circuit Higher Than Expected and P1509 PCV Leak. The first two were caused by a vacuum leak in the extender, the last one was from the fresh air collector; the hose from the top of the cylinder head to the intake. If you got the same size injectors your ECU should have no problem with A/F ratios, I put slightly larger injectors to compensate for the dry kit I have on as well so I’m also running a SAFC2, if you have the money picking up one wouldn’t be a bad idea. Now take it for a test drive and have fun!!!!
As soon as you get a chance get a piece of sheet metal and pound it into the shape you need to fill the part of the firewall you cut make sure you design it so that you can pull the manifold off if needed, take it to a welder and have them weld it in.
Redviking is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 11-04-2006
  #2  
Registered!!
iTrader: (6)
 
boosted.es2's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: viva las vegas
Age: 30
Posts: 1,303
Rep Power: 180
boosted.es2 is a jewel in the roughboosted.es2 is a jewel in the roughboosted.es2 is a jewel in the rough
awesome find! maybe il do this when i get more time and money. i heard the 78 intake mani swap is real good for boost +1 !
boosted.es2 is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 11-04-2006
  #3  
Registered!!
 
Maverick_1337's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Puerto Rico
Posts: 211
Rep Power: 151
Maverick_1337 will become famous soon enoughMaverick_1337 will become famous soon enough
Thanks
Maverick_1337 is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 11-04-2006
  #4  
Member
iTrader: (4)
 
_SKIN_'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Earth
Posts: 120
Rep Power: 0
_SKIN_ is an unknown quantity at this point
I know I will get flamed for this, but why would you want to do this. Does this add hp to a non turbo civic d17? Has anyone done this? And does anyone have any pictures of the whole engine compartment with this mod?
_SKIN_ is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 11-04-2006
  #5  
Don't be a n00b, search ftw
Hey! Look At Me!! I'm a Supporting Member!!
iTrader: (7)
 
01HonderCivic's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Oregon
Age: 32
Posts: 9,365
Rep Power: 255
01HonderCivic has a brilliant future01HonderCivic has a brilliant future01HonderCivic has a brilliant future01HonderCivic has a brilliant future01HonderCivic has a brilliant future01HonderCivic has a brilliant future01HonderCivic has a brilliant future01HonderCivic has a brilliant future01HonderCivic has a brilliant future01HonderCivic has a brilliant future01HonderCivic has a brilliant future
Originally Posted by _SKIN_ View Post
I know I will get flamed for this, but why would you want to do this. Does this add hp to a non turbo civic d17? Has anyone done this? And does anyone have any pictures of the whole engine compartment with this mod?
Let's put it this way. The stock manifold isn't exactly designed with performance in mind. The Y8 Manifold has way better performance potential (due to the side mount TB), and they're cheap as hell. This is why people who run high-end turbo setups either opt for this or have their own made. I don't think anybody who's NA with I/H/E on a stock motor has ever really done this and posted dynos. But look at it this way, once you've done I/H/E. this is just the next step.
01HonderCivic is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 11-05-2006
  #6  
Registered!!
Thread Starter
iTrader: (4)
 
Redviking's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Location: Montreal, Qc, Canada
Posts: 829
Rep Power: 0
Redviking is on a distinguished road
The final result should look like this: (again not from me... but from this site!)







Taken from: http://www.7thgencivic.com/forums/sh...&highlight=ITB

Redviking is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 11-05-2006
  #7  
Registered!!
iTrader: (24)
 
Civicman1988's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Posts: 4,441
Rep Power: 210
Civicman1988 is a glorious beacon of lightCivicman1988 is a glorious beacon of lightCivicman1988 is a glorious beacon of lightCivicman1988 is a glorious beacon of lightCivicman1988 is a glorious beacon of lightCivicman1988 is a glorious beacon of light
good find
Civicman1988 is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 11-05-2006
  #8  
BLDNPSI Mod
Hey! Look At Me!! I'm a Supporting Member!!
iTrader: (2)
 
tfnaaf's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Location: Boise, Idaho
Age: 50
Posts: 3,317
Rep Power: 236
tfnaaf has a reputation beyond reputetfnaaf has a reputation beyond reputetfnaaf has a reputation beyond reputetfnaaf has a reputation beyond reputetfnaaf has a reputation beyond reputetfnaaf has a reputation beyond reputetfnaaf has a reputation beyond reputetfnaaf has a reputation beyond reputetfnaaf has a reputation beyond reputetfnaaf has a reputation beyond reputetfnaaf has a reputation beyond repute
Originally Posted by 01HonderCivic View Post
The Y8 Manifold has way better performance potential (due to the side mount TB), and they're cheap as hell. This is why people who run high-end turbo setups
Actually its not because of the side mount specfically. A top mount actually more evenly feeds each runner, where the typical side mount doesn't effectively feed the last runner like it does the first runner. The performance gain isnt from the side mount per say, but more from the plenum size, and runner size/length
tfnaaf is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 11-05-2006
  #9  
05 civic lx
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
that looks like a sweet mod, but that finished pic is of the stock mani right? if u r going throguh all the trouble of doing the swap y not get a aftermarket mani like skunk2 mani. Skunk also makes a aftermarket TB that can go w/the skunk mani. I think i might do that and then put a weapon-r secret weapon intake on the end of TB ; )
 
Reply With Quote
Old 11-05-2006
  #10  
Registered!!
 
memphisraines26's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Age: 37
Posts: 8
Rep Power: 0
memphisraines26 is an unknown quantity at this point
hmm i would interested in what n/a guys are doing with the d17 and this looks like a must needed step for more n/a power.
memphisraines26 is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 11-12-2006
  #11  
Member
iTrader: (4)
 
_SKIN_'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Earth
Posts: 120
Rep Power: 0
_SKIN_ is an unknown quantity at this point
Originally Posted by 05 civic lx View Post
if u r going throguh all the trouble of doing the swap y not get a aftermarket mani like skunk2 mani.
I agree. That stock one looks horrible.
_SKIN_ is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 11-12-2006
  #12  
Don't be a n00b, search ftw
Hey! Look At Me!! I'm a Supporting Member!!
iTrader: (7)
 
01HonderCivic's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Oregon
Age: 32
Posts: 9,365
Rep Power: 255
01HonderCivic has a brilliant future01HonderCivic has a brilliant future01HonderCivic has a brilliant future01HonderCivic has a brilliant future01HonderCivic has a brilliant future01HonderCivic has a brilliant future01HonderCivic has a brilliant future01HonderCivic has a brilliant future01HonderCivic has a brilliant future01HonderCivic has a brilliant future01HonderCivic has a brilliant future
Well if you guys want to cut into your firewall and make your cylinder head such that you can't revert back to a stock D17 Intake manifold, then go right ahead and put the Skunk2/Edelbrock intake manifolds on. The main reason why this swap is so in demand is because it flows way better then the plastic D17 manifold, and the D16y8 manifold can be had for around 50 bucks max on ebay, way less then the 500 dollar custom ones or even the 300 dollar Skunk2/Edelbrock manfolds.
01HonderCivic is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 11-13-2006
  #13  
05 civic lx
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
if one were to do this mod, would he have to move the battery to the trunk? cuz putting a aftermarket weapon-r intake will go straight where the battery is..
 
Reply With Quote
Old 11-13-2006
  #14  
05 civic lx
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
i think at weapon-r.com you can custom make a intake, maybe u could have the company make like a shorter 1 lol
 
Reply With Quote
Old 06-06-2007
  #15  
Registered!!
iTrader: (1)
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: Barrie Ontario, Canada
Age: 33
Posts: 2,599
Rep Power: 197
paradoxblue will become famous soon enough
Re: Found a DIY for the d16y8 Intake Manifold swap

http://cgi.ebay.ca/Honda-Civic-stock...QQcmdZViewItem

is this the piece it requires?
i may just do this this fall.. hmm
paradoxblue is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 06-06-2007
  #16  
This is Myspace
iTrader: (6)
 
DsevenEm2's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Flawriduh
Age: 29
Posts: 2,345
Rep Power: 168
DsevenEm2 is a splendid one to beholdDsevenEm2 is a splendid one to beholdDsevenEm2 is a splendid one to beholdDsevenEm2 is a splendid one to beholdDsevenEm2 is a splendid one to beholdDsevenEm2 is a splendid one to beholdDsevenEm2 is a splendid one to beholdDsevenEm2 is a splendid one to beholdDsevenEm2 is a splendid one to beholdDsevenEm2 is a splendid one to behold
Re: Found a DIY for the d16y8 Intake Manifold swap

are u really trying to revive this thread...lol
DsevenEm2 is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 06-06-2007
  #17  
My Pony Princess is the inspiration for my ride.
iTrader: (17)
 
speedfoos's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Age: 42
Posts: 5,187
Rep Power: 0
speedfoos is an unknown quantity at this point
Re: Found a DIY for the d16y8 Intake Manifold swap

If so, mind the EGR channel on the D17 that lines up with the coolant hole on the Y8....
speedfoos is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 09-16-2007
  #18  
Registered!!
iTrader: (2)
 
j182j's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Posts: 97
Rep Power: 170
j182j has a spectacular aura aboutj182j has a spectacular aura aboutj182j has a spectacular aura about
Re: Found a DIY for the d16y8 Intake Manifold swap

then how are they getting these to work then?
j182j is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 09-16-2007
  #19  
Registered!!
iTrader: (2)
 
rick1574's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: anywhere but here.
Age: 31
Posts: 155
Rep Power: 139
rick1574 will become famous soon enough
Re: Found a DIY for the d16y8 Intake Manifold swap

is anyone running this kinda set up? is it worth it?
rick1574 is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 09-17-2007
  #20  
My Pony Princess is the inspiration for my ride.
iTrader: (17)
 
speedfoos's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Age: 42
Posts: 5,187
Rep Power: 0
speedfoos is an unknown quantity at this point
Re: Found a DIY for the d16y8 Intake Manifold swap

I'll be running this setup by Christmas but will be cutting the Y8 flange off and getting the D17 injector plate welded on. It's racing season so my welder is busy.
speedfoos is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 09-17-2007
  #21  
Banned
iTrader: (1)
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Mobile, AL
Age: 36
Posts: 213
Rep Power: 0
7thgen.nick has a spectacular aura about7thgen.nick has a spectacular aura about
Re: Found a DIY for the d16y8 Intake Manifold swap

are you going to use the stock d16 intake or go with aftermarket/custom?
7thgen.nick is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 09-17-2007
  #22  
Banned
iTrader: (1)
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Mobile, AL
Age: 36
Posts: 213
Rep Power: 0
7thgen.nick has a spectacular aura about7thgen.nick has a spectacular aura about
Re: Found a DIY for the d16y8 Intake Manifold swap

what is a good fuel rail for return fuel system that would work fir this swap?
7thgen.nick is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 09-17-2007
  #23  
My Pony Princess is the inspiration for my ride.
iTrader: (17)
 
speedfoos's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Age: 42
Posts: 5,187
Rep Power: 0
speedfoos is an unknown quantity at this point
Re: Found a DIY for the d16y8 Intake Manifold swap

I'm going to use the stock Y8 mani with the the D17 injector plate welded to it so I can use my existing D17 fuel rail and injectors. It's already got the return bung on it. Then I'll either use the Y8 TB or get a flange machined for my D17 TB, I haven't quite decided yet.
speedfoos is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 09-17-2007
  #24  
Registered!!
iTrader: (5)
 
cinaibur's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: Memphis, TN
Age: 30
Posts: 497
Rep Power: 150
cinaibur is just really nicecinaibur is just really nicecinaibur is just really nicecinaibur is just really nicecinaibur is just really nice
Re: Found a DIY for the d16y8 Intake Manifold swap

hey Foos, I know a lot of people are using the y8 for turbo setups, but would this have any advantage on an NA build?
cinaibur is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 09-18-2007
  #25  
My Pony Princess is the inspiration for my ride.
iTrader: (17)
 
speedfoos's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Age: 42
Posts: 5,187
Rep Power: 0
speedfoos is an unknown quantity at this point
Re: Found a DIY for the d16y8 Intake Manifold swap

Technically any manifold will have advantage over our plastic manifold. As was pointed out to me by boiler, our mani causes the air to make a sudden change in direction (down, then back up) before going into the head. This can't be good for performance. However, reportedly, you won't see a lot of gains on an N/A setup strictly from just swapping the manifold. For an N/A, IIRC you want longer runners which is what the YB has when compared to our stock one. Honestly the skunk, venom, or edelbrock is desgined better for an N/A setup.
speedfoos is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 09-18-2007
  #26  
Registered!!
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Middleboro,MA
Age: 36
Posts: 1,222
Rep Power: 205
02fpcivic is a glorious beacon of light02fpcivic is a glorious beacon of light02fpcivic is a glorious beacon of light02fpcivic is a glorious beacon of light02fpcivic is a glorious beacon of light02fpcivic is a glorious beacon of light02fpcivic is a glorious beacon of light
Re: Found a DIY for the d16y8 Intake Manifold swap

Well if you use a stand-alone you can pull the EGR off and make a block off plate, or probably just unplug it to solve that problem.

Foos, runner length and diameter is determined by several factors, mostly its about where you need the power/where the engine will perform best. There are LOTs of other factors too though. The stock runners are actually longer than the Y8 if you measure them on center.
02fpcivic is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 09-18-2007
  #27  
Registered!!
iTrader: (5)
 
cinaibur's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: Memphis, TN
Age: 30
Posts: 497
Rep Power: 150
cinaibur is just really nicecinaibur is just really nicecinaibur is just really nicecinaibur is just really nicecinaibur is just really nice
Re: Found a DIY for the d16y8 Intake Manifold swap

Originally Posted by speedfoos View Post
Technically any manifold will have advantage over our plastic manifold. As was pointed out to me by boiler, our mani causes the air to make a sudden change in direction (down, then back up) before going into the head. This can't be good for performance. However, reportedly, you won't see a lot of gains on an N/A setup strictly from just swapping the manifold. For an N/A, IIRC you want longer runners which is what the YB has when compared to our stock one. Honestly the skunk, venom, or edelbrock is desgined better for an N/A setup.
Doesn't the aftermarkets lke the skunk and venom hit the firewall?
cinaibur is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 09-18-2007
  #28  
Registered!!
iTrader: (11)
 
tuningmycivic's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: Raeford, NC
Age: 38
Posts: 2,619
Rep Power: 190
tuningmycivic is a name known to alltuningmycivic is a name known to alltuningmycivic is a name known to alltuningmycivic is a name known to alltuningmycivic is a name known to alltuningmycivic is a name known to alltuningmycivic is a name known to alltuningmycivic is a name known to all
Re: Found a DIY for the d16y8 Intake Manifold swap

hence the need for hacking the firewall and relocating hose/wiring. it even says so in the DIY.
tuningmycivic is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 09-18-2007
  #29  
My Pony Princess is the inspiration for my ride.
iTrader: (17)
 
speedfoos's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Age: 42
Posts: 5,187
Rep Power: 0
speedfoos is an unknown quantity at this point
Re: Found a DIY for the d16y8 Intake Manifold swap

Yes but Jesus made 4" die grinders for little problems like that.
speedfoos is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 09-18-2007
  #30  
Registered!!
iTrader: (6)
 
thefivespeeder's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Reppin' the 401
Age: 32
Posts: 741
Rep Power: 173
thefivespeeder is a jewel in the roughthefivespeeder is a jewel in the roughthefivespeeder is a jewel in the rough
Re: Found a DIY for the d16y8 Intake Manifold swap

Originally Posted by speedfoos View Post
Yes but Jesus made 4" die grinders for little problems like that.
LOL!
thefivespeeder is offline  
Reply With Quote
Reply
 
 
 
Related Topics
Thread
Thread Starter
Honda Civic Forum
Replies
Last Post
lienhart88
Advanced Engine Performance and Swaps
1
05-19-2015 08:48 PM
oqjoi
Mechanical Problems/Vehicle Issues and Fix-it Forum
2
05-09-2015 10:31 PM
ORskier
Mechanical Problems/Vehicle Issues and Fix-it Forum
2
05-03-2015 12:54 PM
mievil
Mechanical Problems/Vehicle Issues and Fix-it Forum
2
04-28-2015 11:02 PM
civicdown4u
General Honda Civic Forum Archive.
6
11-21-2001 10:44 PM


Thread Tools
Search this Thread